Blog

Taking the Tradition out of Education

Many schools pride themselves on their ability to foster tradition and school spirit in its students. While tradition is a fine way of bonding students with a sense of connection, it is an outdated way to rely on learning methods.

Using the Involvement Factor

Many educators wonder— why the push for 1-to-1 technology? Sure, it’s worth implementing once a week, but isn’t this level of computer involvement expensive and unfamiliar? This might be the case, but it’s no challenge in the face of a school’s return on investment for educational technology incorporation.

The Day I Was Asked to Cheat on Homework

A few weeks ago, an advertisement for a content writing firm popped up on my screen. The identity of this firm shall remain nameless…at least for the time being. I’ve thought about writing blogs and other online content for other people, so I decided to check them out as a little side gig for extra cash. I mean, why not? Right?

Discovering the Three Es

Starting the year on the right foot is a challenge we highly anticipate. Teachers have been making lesson plans, decorating and stocking the classroom, and preparing to welcome back students with a passionate heart. Students electrify the hallways with the energy of seeing friends again, and the curiosity for what they might learn. You’ve pulled together this year’s curriculum, and still, you need resources to aid your lesson plans. I’m here to tell you about a writing resource that will provide your students with the Three Es of learning excellence: Enabled, Engaged, and Empowered.

Don Your Cape and Conquer the World

Let’s be honest… teachers are real life superheroes. How often do we hear parents complain about their twin tyrants (in their “terrible twos,” not to mention) destroying the house and any patience that once sufficed for a new mother? How quickly does the knee-jerk reaction kick in before you can stop the words, “Try being a kindergarten teacher?”

What I Wanted but Never Had in the Classroom

My name is Kate, and I recently graduated from college. Since then, I’ve been working for Virtual Village Classroom; our founder is Darren Butler, a published children’s author and, in my opinion, a writer extraordinaire. Mr. Butler visited my classes when I was younger and gave us writing instruction. I loved his visits, and could visibly see my writing skills improve.

Not-so-social media in the classroom

Darren Butler recently published a blog about using student blogs in the classroom. He suggests that teachers who seek web security begin by creating “Blog Walls,” where teachers can have students display their written work on a wall of the classroom. Once the teacher is prepared to introduce technology, students can use various apps and websites that cater to the needs of student security.

Lessons from Writers: Surviving Your Reality

I’ve been writing for as long as I can remember. Teachers marveled at my creative potential at such a young age, and encouraged me to keep up the good work. I was never told that creative writing teaches some tough lessons. I’ve faced the fear, rejection, and the isolation that comes with the creative muse, but at least I’ve had other writers to influence my journey. This is what I’ve learned:

Dear Educators, Thank you!

Hi there! My name is Kate, and I am a recent college graduate, now working my dream job as Project Manager here at Virtual Village Classroom. Today, I wanted to write a special letter to the educators out there who made a difference in my life, and make a difference in the lives of students everywhere. The greatest benefit of serving as a teacher is the fact that you have the potential to save a child’s life. You may not know his or her background. You won’t always understand why a little boy clings to your dress or a little girl tugs your hair and shoots spit balls at you, but intuition tells us these children crave attention.

A One-stop Shop for Connecting Learning Styles

Think back on your college years, for a moment. What kind of training did you undergo to receive your teaching certification? Were you instructed to mold your classroom activities to the different learning modes? Did you cater to your students’ needs so that all learners gained valuable experience in the classroom?